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Global Climate Change DigestArchives of the
Global Climate Change Digest

A Guide to Information on Greenhouse Gases and Ozone Depletion
Published July 1988 through June 1999

FROM VOLUME 8, NUMBER 5, MAY 1995

REPORTS...
EMISSIONS: METHANE


Item #d95may56

Methane Emissions (Watt Committee Rep. 28), A. Williams, Ed., 171 pp., 1995, 50 (add 5 postage outside the U.K). Contact Alan Williams, Leeds Univ., U.K.

Total British anthropogenic methane emissions are about 5 million tonnes, the largest single source of which is landfills, followed by the agriculture and energy sectors. Offers an improved basis for the current U.K. inventory of methane emissions, and a methodology for future inventories, which can be used under the Climate Convention for the U.K.'s program.


Item #d95may57

The following three reports are available from CSERGE. Each costs $9/5.

Methane Embodied in the International Trade of Commodities: Implications for Global Emissions (GEC 95-04), S. Subak, 24 pp., 1995.

Methane Emissions from Rice and Coarse Fiber Production (GEC 94-08), F. Mudge, N. Adger, 46 pp., 1994.

Methane from the House of Tudor and the Ming Dynasty (GEC 94-06), S. Subak, 20 pp., 1994.


Item #d95may58

Global Methane and the Coal Industry, Coal Industry Advisory Board, 70 pp., 1994, $24/FF130/DM39 (IEA/OECD).

Of the 25 million tonnes of methane produced from coal mining, only a little more then one million tonnes are exploited for industrial use. Under ideal conditions 60-70% could be recovered; under less favorable conditions, that figure would drop to 30-40%. Obstacles to recovery relate to the economic viability of the coal mine, gas ownership, inconsistent taxation, industrial financial conditions, and availability of technology.

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