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Annual Energy Outlook 2002 with Projections to 2020
The Annual Energy Outlook 2002 presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2020 prepared by the DOE Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System. (2.4MB PDF file)
 
US Energy Department Pursues Technological Answers to Climate Change
Hydrogen fuel cells, carbon sequestration, expanded nuclear energy studied. U.S. Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham has outlined three areas of research into technologies that may reduce greenhouse gas emissions and the effects of climate change. Abraham spoke December 3 at a Washington meeting of more than 1,300 scientists and experts from 30 countries, assembled to assess the U.S. climate change research strategy. (38KB PDF file)
 
Research Builds Understanding of Earth's Climate
U.S. Deputy Secretary of Commerce Sam Bodman told an international meeting of climate scientists and stakeholders at U.S. Climate Change Science Program Workshop that the United States – through an extensive research effort – is leading the world to a better understanding of the Earth's climate system. (29KB PDF file)
 
Experts Review New U.S. Climate Change Strategy
The Climate Change Science Program Planning Workshop held December 3-5 drew participants from the United States and more than 30 other countries to review a draft version of the U.S. climate change research strategy, which sets priorities for the nation's $1,800-million annual multi-agency research program on climate change. The draft strategic plan, issued on November 11, was prepared by 13 federal agencies participating in the administration's Climate Change Science Program. (18KB PDF file)
 
Secretary of Commerce Evans on Climate Change
An aggressive new U.S. climate change research strategy, designed to accelerate answers to critical questions about the environment, will be the focus of more than 1,100 experts from throughout the country and the world when they convene in Washington this week. Climate science as a fully understood and universally accepted discipline is still in its infancy. We know that the surface temperature of the Earth has warmed, rising 0.6 degrees Celsius (1 degree Fahrenheit) over the past century. And the National Academy of Sciences indicates that human activity is a contributing factor to higher concentrations of greenhouse gases. (18KB PDF file)
 
Remarks by NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe at Climate Change Workshop
NASA is committed over the long haul to developing a flotilla of 26 Earth observing satellites and other technologies that will help provide scientists a solid foundation for understanding the complex Earth climate system. In addition to developing and managing these unique Earth observing systems, NASA will effectively disseminate the data and information it produces, and also will continue to make a significant investment in on-the-ground scientific research. Once NASA has placed its entire constellation of satellites in orbit, NASA will help transition this capability to a sustainable observational system, and will forge ahead in developing additional cutting-edge Earth observational technologies. (26KB PDF file)
 
Research on Permanent Storage of Carbon Dioxide Expanded
The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is moving into a new, expanded phase of its program to develop carbon sequestration projects, including studying the potential of injecting carbon dioxide emissions from power plants into underground aquifers. Carbon dioxide, from the burning of fossil fuels, contributes to global warming. (19KB PDF file)
 
Ministers Call for Action to Reduce Impacts of Global Warming
Delhi Declaration links climate change to sustainable development. Environmental ministers and senior officials from some 170 countries meeting in New Delhi reached agreement on a final resolution that highlights the need for aid to help developing countries adapt to the adverse impacts of climate change. The Eighth Session of the Conference of the Parties (COP-8) to the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change, held from October 23 to November 1, adopted the so-called Delhi Ministerial Declaration, which calls for strengthening international collaboration on climate change and addressing the issue in the broader context of sustainable development. (32KB PDF file)
 
U.S. Expresses Support of "Delhi Declaration" on Climate Change
In a closing statement November 1 at the end of United Nations-sponsored talks in New Delhi on climate change, the head of the U.S. delegation, Under Secretary of State for Global Affairs Paula Dobriansky, expressed support for the conference declaration. (16KB PDF file)
 
US-India Technology Cooperation on Global Climate Change
A new model for partnership between developed and developing countries worldwide is evolving to address climate change concerns. The US-India Technology Cooperation on Global Climate Change side event on October 31st at the UNFCCC COP-8 provides an important forum to highlight US-India collaboration on protecting the global environment. (181KB PDF file)
 
Inputs to the Delhi Declaration
Harlan L. Watson, Senior Climate Negotiator and Special Representative and Head of the U.S. Delegation. Remarks to the Eighth Session of the Conference of Parties (COP-8) to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. New Delhi, India, 25 October 2002. (16KB PDF file)
 
U.S. and New Zealand Work to Improve Bilateral Climate Change Cooperation
The United States and New Zealand plan to enhance their cooperation in the field of climate change, according to the State Department. In an October 24 joint statement, the State Department said Under Secretary of State for Global Affairs Paula Dobriansky and the Honorable Pete Hodgson, Convenor of New Zealand's Ministerial Group on Climate Change, met in Washington, D.C. to "exchange views on climate change." The two officials agreed to enhance "bilateral dialogue and practical cooperation," the State Department said. "The United States and New Zealand agreed that climate change was a pressing issue that requires a global solution," the State Department added. (17KB PDF file)
 
United States Record of Action to Address Climate Change Domestically
The U.S. Department of State reports that the United States achieved a 2.7 percent decline in greenhouse gas emissions in 2000, demonstrating the government’s action to address the problem of climate change. The State Department released a fact sheet on U.S. actions to control emissions as an international meeting on climate change began in New Delhi October 23. (60KB PDF file)
 
United States Global Climate Change Policy
The U.S. Department of State has released a summary of the U.S. policy on climate change first announced by the Bush administration in February 2002. The document is issued as U.S. experts joined counterparts from around the world October 23 to convene the annual meeting on the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change in New Delhi. (68KB PDF file)
 
U.S. Will Be Active Partner in Upcoming Climate Change Talks
The United States will be "very active" in the talks on climate change beginning October 23 in New Delhi, but will play a "low key role" in discussions relating to the Kyoto Protocol and its implementation, according to Harlan Watson, senior U.S. climate negotiator and a leading member of the U.S. State Department delegation to the talks. The meeting is the Eighth Conference of the Parties (COP-8) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). (20KB PDF file)
 
Researchers Cite Near-Term Control Strategies for Global Warming
While many scientists and policy makers have focused on how heat-trapping greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide are altering the global climate, several new studies report that both air pollution and global warming could be significantly reduced by controlling emissions of methane gas and black carbon soot, and limiting activities like urban sprawl and deforestation that cause land surface changes. (20KB PDF file)
 
NOAA Vision for Global Observing System
Retired Navy Vice Adm. Conrad C. Lautenbacher, Ph.D., undersecretary of commerce for oceans and atmosphere and administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), will describe NOAA’s broad vision of the future of global environmental monitoring of the Earth. Lautenbacher will present a talk at the world's aerospace community’s once-in-a-decade meeting -- the World Space Congress -- at the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston October 10-19, 2002. (16KB PDF file)
 
New Climate Change Science Web Site
The U.S. Climate Change Science Program Office, incorporating the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) and the Climate Change Research Initiative (CCRI), recently launched its Web site, http://www.climatescience.gov. The new site will be the main clearinghouse for information on the Bush Administration's interagency climate science initiative -- including its Strategic Plan, which will provide the principal guidance for the U.S. global change and climate change research programs during the next several years. (10KB PDF file)
 
Global Climate Change -- Market-Based Strategies to Reduce Greenhouse Gases
The possibility that human activities are releasing gases, including carbon dioxide (CO2), at rates that could affect global climate has resulted in proposals for national programs to curtail emissions. An international framework for specific reductions in greenhouse gases was negotiated at a meeting in Kyoto in December 1997. Concern about costs has encouraged consideration of CO2 reduction proposals that employ market-based mechanisms. The passage in 1990 of a tradeable allowance system for sulfur dioxide control in the United States to reduce acid rain provides a precedent for such mechanisms. (93KB PDF file)
 
UN Conference on Global Warming - COP-8
Eighth Session of the Conference of the Parties to the Climate Change Convention. According to a September 30, 2002 United Nations press release, delegates will use the meeting -- known officially as the Eighth Session of the Conference of the Parties to the Climate Change Convention -- to prepare for the entry into force of the 1997 Kyoto Protocol. The delegates will also focus on key concerns of developing countries, such as how to cope with the expected impacts of climate change. (18KB PDF file)
 
NASA Soot Study
Study collects data in China and India - scientists say soot particles can lead to flooding and drought. A new climate study finds that large amounts of soot particles and other pollutants are causing changes in precipitation and temperatures that may be responsible for the tendency toward increased floods and droughts in China and other Asian regions over the last several decades. A National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) press release says the results of the study, published in the September 27 issue of the journal Science, indicate that black carbon or soot can affect regional climate by absorbing sunlight, heating the air and thereby altering large-scale atmospheric circulation and the hydrologic cycle. (20KB PDF file)
 
U.S. Climate Change Research and Technology Progress Outlined
In a letter to President Bush, Secretary of Commerce Don Evans and Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham submitted a progress update on federal climate change science and technology programs. The update, from the cabinet level Committee on Climate Change Science and Technology Integration, jointly chaired by Evans and Abraham, outlines steps taken in four key areas: federal climate research, technology development, voluntary emissions reduction, and collaborative international activities. (70KB PDF file)
 
NASA Study Predicts Warming Even With Emission Reductions
A new study funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) predicts that the world’s climate will warm over the next 50 years regardless of whether nations soon curb their greenhouse gas emissions, such as carbon dioxide (CO2) from the burning of fossil fuels. The study found that global temperatures may increase by 1 to 2 degrees Celsius if no reductions in greenhouse gas emissions are made and they continue to increase at the current rate. But if the growth rate of carbon dioxide does not exceed its current rate and if the growth of true air pollutants – substances that are harmful to human health – is reversed, temperatures may rise by only 0.75 degrees Celsius. (19KB PDF file)
 
U.S.-Mexico Climate Change Related Programs
Summary of U.S. Federal Agency programs and interests in climate change research and technology and related areas with Mexico. (794KB PDF file)
 
Secretary Powell's Remarks at World Summit on Sustainable Development
"The United States is taking action to meet environmental challenges, including global climate change, not just rhetoric. We are committed to a multi-billion dollar program to develop and deploy advanced technologies to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions." (29KB PDF file)
 
US Supports Use of Renewable Energy
A senior US official at the World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD) said August 28 [2002] that the United States strongly supports the use of renewable energy sources to bring energy services to people who now have no access, but opposes setting global targets for renewable energy. (18KB PDF file)
 
US-Korea To Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions
U.S.-Republic of Korea Joint Statement on Enhanced Bilateral Climate Change Cooperation: The Republic of Korea and the United States exchanged views on their policies on global climate change and agreed to enhance their bilateral cooperation. The United States explained the policy announced by President Bush on February 14, 2002, under which the United States is taking action to address climate change to achieve a new and ambitious national goal for reducing projected emissions growth in the next decade. The Republic of Korea reiterated its commitment to the Kyoto Protocol to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and stated that it is pursuing the relevant domestic procedures to ratify the Kyoto Protocol. Communication and cooperation between the two countries will help to advance both the U.S. and Korean efforts. (16KB PDF file)
 
NOAA Announces Satellite Data Conference
A conference targeted at all users in the Americas of satellite data collected by the United States will be held December 9-13 in Miami, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has announced. The agency said that during the next several years, the satellite system operated by NOAA will undergo significant changes and technological improvements. The purpose of the conference is to begin preparing all users for these upcoming changes. (15KB PDF file)
 
UNEP Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion - 2002 (Executive Summary)
Since the "Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion: 1998," numerous laboratory investigations, atmospheric observations, and theoretical and modeling studies have produced new key findings and have strengthened overall understanding of the ozone layer, ozone depletion, and its effect on ultraviolet (UV) radiation. These advances are highlighted in this summary of the current understanding of the impact of human activities and natural phenomena on the ozone layer and the coupling of the ozone layer and the climate system. (68KB PDF file)
 
U.S. Officials Seek Real Development Results at Johannesburg Summit
A U.S. delegation, led by Secretary of State Colin Powell, joins those from over 170 countries participating in the environment and development summit being held in Johannesburg, South Africa, August 26 to September 4. The delegations, many led by heads of government, are set to finalize a new global implementation plan to accelerate sustainable development and launch a series of innovative partnership activities at the regional, national and international level. (20KB PDF file)
 
U.S. Emissions Inventory - 2002
Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2000. Central to any study of climate change is the development of an emissions inventory that identifies and quantifies a country's primary anthropogenic sources and sinks of greenhouse gases. This current inventory adheres to both (1) a comprehensive and detailed methodology for estimating sources and sinks of anthropogenic greenhouse gases, and (2) a common and consistent mechanism that enables signatory countries to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to compare the relative contribution of different emission sources and greenhouse gases to climate change. Moreover, systematically and consistently estimating national and international emissions is a prerequisite for accounting for reductions and evaluating mitigation strategies. (6MB PDF file)
 
Russia Ends Production of Ozone Depleting Substances
The World Bank announced August 6 that $17.3 million will be paid to compensate seven Russian enterprises that have ceased producing chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and halons, the most potent substances found to deplete Earth's ozone layer. (16KB PDF file)
 
United States Statement Regarding Global Climate Change
In a statement by Dr. John Marburger, Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Science on July 10th, it was noted that in a series of clear and public statements, the President of the United States described climate change as a complex, long-term challenge that requires an effective and science-based response. The President acknowledged the responsibility of the United States to lead in dealing with this challenge. (17KB PDF file)
 
2002-2003 Australia-U.S. Climate Action Partnership (CAP) Activities
Six specific activities have been identified for the initial phase of the CAP. These projects build on existing collaboration and extend it into new and high priority areas. Each of the selected areas of activity is intended to benefit from joint application of U.S. and Australian expertise, sharing of technology developments and Australia's proximity to key geographic regions in the climate system, such as Antarctica and the Indian and Southern oceans. The cooperation envisaged aims to reduce key uncertainties and improve the capacity of climate chnage science to inform the policy making process. (38KB PDF file)
 
U.S., Australia Establish Climate Change Research Site
Darwin will be newest Atmospheric Radiation Measurement facility. On July 30, 2002, the United States and Australia will formally commission a new site to monitor severe weather conditions, such as drought and monsoons, in Darwin, Australia, according to a US Department of Energy statement. The Darwin facility will be part of the global Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program, enabling scientists to collect data critical for computer models that accurately simulate climate change. (23KB PDF file)
 
Researchers Say New Farm Practices Will Help Fight Climate Change
New program seeks ways to store carbon in agricultural soils. Researchers report that new farm practices and new breeds of crops may provide a way to control carbon dioxide and other heat-trapping greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming. According to a July 2 press release, a nine-university consortium has begun a $15-million research program aimed at finding ways to increase the retention of carbon dioxide in agricultural soils and develop new crop plants that help to store carbon -- a process known as carbon sequestration. (23KB PDF file)
 
Testimony of James R. Mahoney Before the Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation, US Senate, 11 July 2002
Dr. Mahoney, Ass istant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere, presented testimony abou t the Administration's scientific research program on global change and climate change. He stated that the status of the entire earth system, including the pote ntial impacts of climate and ecosystem variability (regardless of its origin), i s a capstone issue for our generation and will continue to be so for our childre n. The Administration fully embraces the need to provide the best possible scien tific basis for understanding the complex interactions that determine the consta ntly changing nature of our earth's life systems. Moreover, the Administration i s committed to making full use of our best scientific information to determine o ptimal investments and actions on the global, national and regional scales to mi tigate adverse anthropogenic changes, and to adapt to unavoidable natural change s. (172KB PDF file)
 
Testimony of James R. Mahoney Before the Committee on Science, US House of Representatives, 10 July 2002
Dr. Mahoney, Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere, presented testimony about the Administration's scientific research program on global change and climate change. He stated that the status of the entire earth system, including the potential impacts of climate and ecosystem variability (regardless of its origin), is a capstone issue for our generation and will continue to be so for our children. The Administration fully embraces the need to provide the best possible scientific basis for understanding the complex interactions that determine the constantly changing nature of our earth's life systems. Moreover, the Administration is committed to making full use of our best scientific information to determine optimal investments and actions on the global, national and regional scales to mitigate adverse anthropogenic changes, and to adapt to unavoidable natural changes. (172KB PDF file)
 
The US-Australia Climate Action Partnership Moves Forward
The Federal Minister for the Environment and Heritage, Dr David Kemp, met in Washington on July 9th with Dr Paula Dobriansky, US Undersecretary of State, to discuss the Australia-US Climate Action Partnership. Dr Kemp and Dr Dobriansky announced the first set of cooperative projects to be implemented under the Partnership. The program includes 19 projects in the following areas: climate change science and monitoring; renewable and reduced emission stationary energy technologies; engagement with business on technology development, and policy design and implementation; capacity building in developing countries; and greenhouse accounting in the forestry and agriculture sectors. (137KB PDF file)
 
Global Climate Change: Fact Or Fiction? It Doesn't Matter -- The Issue Is Here To Stay
Climate change as an issue for business leaders will not go away. It will increasingly affect the way business is done. But here's the good news: by effectively meeting the challenge of climate change, businesses will also deal effectively with several other issues (energy costs, reliability, and volatility) that affect competitiveness. New business opportunities will very likely be discovered in the process. Forward-looking business managers who approach climate change from this perspective can expect to gain long-term competitive advantage as a result. (76KB PDF file)
 
Dr. Marburger Before the Subcommittee on Science, Technology and Space
Statement of The Honorable John Marburger, III; Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy before the Subcommittee on Science, Technology and Space; Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee; United States Senate; May 22, 2002 to discuss the President's Fiscal Year 2003 budget request for research and development, including climate change research. (17KB PDF file)
 
CRS Global Climate Change: Market-Based Strategies to Reduce Greenhouse Gases
[Updated June 20, 2002] In February 2002, the Bush Administration initiated a new voluntary greenhouse gas reduction program. Rather than attempting to meet a specific reduction target, the proposal focuses on improving the carbon efficiency of the economy. In November 2001, the Seventh Conference of Parties to the Framework Convention on Climate Change concluded negotiations on implementation of the Kyoto Protocol. With respect to flexible implementation mechanisms, the Parties outlined the institutions that would oversee the flexible implementation mechanisms contained in the Protocol. The Administration announced in March that the Kyoto Protocol was "dead" as far as it was concerned. However, EPA Administrator Whitman emphasized that the Administration hoped to work constructively with the European Commission to develop technologies and market-based incentives to address global climate change. (105KB PDF file)
 
NOAA Chief Announces New Funding for Global Climate
Vice Admiral Conrad C. Lautenbacher Jr. USN (Ret.), U.S. undersecretary of commerce for oceans and atmosphere and NOAA administrator on June 11th announced new U.S. funding for the Global Climate Observing System, an international effort to investigate global climate change processes and observations located within the World Meteorological Organization. (59KB PDF file)
 
NOAA Head to Promote Climate Science
The Commerce Department's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) today announced that Vice Admiral Conrad C. Lautenbacher Jr. USN (ret.), undersecretary of Commerce for oceans and atmosphere and NOAA administrator will meet with senior leaders from European and international ocean, climate and space organizations during a week long trip (June 7-13) to Germany, France, Switzerland and England. The Vice Admiral's main focus for will be promoting international cooperation and support for expanding the present global climate observation system. (66KB PDF file)
 
Promoting Innovation and Competitiveness: President Bush's Technology Agenda
This 2002 Technology Agenda highlights steps President Bush is taking to promote innovation, support entrepreneurship, and empower citizens. "The role of government is not to create wealth; the role of our government is to create an environment in which the entrepreneur can flourish, in which minds can expand, in which technologies can reach new frontiers." (2.8MB PDF file)
 
US Official Calls for Integrated Global Climate Observing System
Vice Admiral Conrad Lautenbacher, Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), has called for a fully implemented global satellite observing system for climate that will provide the tools needed to take "the pulse of the planet." In this June 11th statement to the Executive Council of the World Meteorological Organization, Adm. Lautenbacher also called for open sharing of data among nations. (35KB PDF file)
 
U.S. Climate Action Report 2002
Third National Communication of the United States of America Under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.
 
U.S. Climate Report Says Protecting Economy Has High Priority
Study links human actions to global warming. (115KB PDF file)
 
CRS Issue Brief for Congress: Global Climate Change - Market-Based Strategies to Reduce Greenhouse Gases
[May 2, 2002] The possibility that human activities are releasing gases, including carbon dioxide (CO2), at rates that could affect global climate has resulted in proposals for national programs to curtail emissions. An international framework for specific reductions in greenhouse gases was negotiated at a meeting in Kyoto in December 1997. Concern about costs has encouraged consideration of CO2 reduction proposals that employ market-based mechanisms. The passage in 1990 of a tradeable allowance system for sulfur dioxide (SO2) control in the United States provides a precedent for such mechanisms. (91KB PDF file)
 
CRS Issue Brief for Congress: Global Climate Change - U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Status, Trends, and Projections
[March 12, 2002] In the 1997 Kyoto Protocol to the UNFCCC, the U.S. participated in negotiations that ended with agreement on carbon dioxide reductions that could become legally binding. The United States signed the Kyoto Protocol in 1998, but President Clinton did not send it to the Senate for advice and consent. President Bush has said that he rejects the Protocol, and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Whitman has told reporters that the Administration will not be pursuing the UNFCCC commitment either. Instead, President Bush is proposing to shift the nation's climate change program from a goal of reducing emissions per se to a goal of reducing energy intensity - the amount of greenhouse gases emitted per unit of economic productivity. Under the proposal, the intensity, which has been declining for a number of years, would decline 18% between 2002 and 2012, as opposed to a 14% projected "business as usual" decline. (133KB PDF file)
 
CRS Issue Brief for Congress: Global Climate Change
[March 27, 2002] There is concern that human activities are affecting the heat/energy-exchange balance between Earth, the atmosphere, and space, and inducing global climate change, often termed "global warming." Human activities, particularly the burning of fossil fuels, have increased atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and other trace greenhouse gases. If these gases continue to accumulate in the atmosphere at current rates, most scientists believe global warming would occur through intensification of Earth's natural heat-trapping "greenhouse effect." Possible impacts might be seen as both positive and negative. (136KB PDF file)
 
The U.S. Greenhouse Gas Inventory: In Brief
The "Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks" provides important information about greenhouse gases, quantifies how much of each gas was emitted into the atmosphere, and describes some of the effects of these emissions on the environment. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Greenhouse Gas Inventory Program has developed extensive technical expertise, internationally recognized analytical methodologies, and one of the most rigorous management systems in the world for estimation, documentation, and evaluation of greenhouse gas emissions and sinks for all source categories. (2.2MB PDF file)
 
Evolving U.S. Policy on Climate Change
Remarks by Mr. Harlan Watson, U.S. Department of State Senior Climate Negotiator and Special Representative, on 14 May 2002. (117KB PDF file)
 
Human Interactions with the Carbon Cycle: Summary of a Workshop
The workshop, which was held in Washington on November 5, 2001, addressed the following three substantive topics: the future of fossil fuel consumption, carbon implications of future land use/land cover transformation, and modeling human interactions with the carbon cycle. (2MB PDF file)
 
Notice of Inquiry and Request for Comment on Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Reductions, and Carbon Sequestration
Federal Register Department of Energy Notice: May 6, 2002 (Volume 67, Number 87, pages 30370-30373): Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Reductions, and Carbon Sequestration. (72 KB PDF file)
 
Assistant Secretary Turner's May 7 Testimony on Environmental Treaties
John F. Turner, Assistant Secretary of State for Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs, discusses six important international agreements that have been submitted to the US Senate for Advice and Consent - the Protocol Concerning Specially Protected Areas and Wildlife (SPAW) to the Convention for the Protection and Development of the Marine Environment of the Wider Caribbean Region (Cartagena Convention), or the "SPAW Protocol;" the South Pacific Regional Environment Program (SPREP) Agreement; the Niue Boundary Treaty; an amendment to the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission; and two amendments to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, the "Montreal Amendment" and the "Beijing Amendment." (83KB PDF file)
 
U.S.-India Joint Statement on Climate Change: Statement on the Visit of Mr. Harlan Watson, U.S. Climate Change Negotiator and Special Representative
Mr. Harlan Watson, U.S. Senior Climate Change Negotiator and Special Representative, visited New Delhi on April 29-30, 2002. He called on Minister of Power, Mr. Suresh Prabhu, and Secretary, Ministry of Environment and Forests, and met senior officials from Ministries of Environment and Forests, Power, Petroleum and Natural Gas, Non-Conventional Energy Sources and External Affairs. (75KB PDF file)
 
Under Secretary for Oceans and Atmosphere Conrad C. Lautenbacher, Jr., Statement for the US Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation
Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere Conrad C. Lautenbacher, Jr., testified on May 1 before the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee. He testified on the President's FY 2003 NOAA Budget Request. Acting Chair Ron Wyden and Sen. Olympia Snowe asked Under Secretary Lautenbacher about Pacific Coast groundfish, Klamath Basin, court-ordered Northeast fisheries restrictions, the Administration Clean Skies and Climate Change Research Initiatives, and other issues. (124KB PDF file)
 
High-Level Meeting on Climate Change Between The United States and The European Union
This joint press statement was released on April 23 by the United States and the European Union at the conclusion of a meeting of representatives to the U.S.-EU High Level Dialogue on Climate Change at the Department of State. The U.S. Delegation was headed by: Governor Christie Whitman, Administrator, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA); Paula Dobriansky, Under Secretary of State for Global Affairs; and Jim Connaughton, Chairman, Council on Environmental Quality, Executive Office of the President. The EU Delegation was headed by: Jaume Matas, Spanish Minister for the Environment (representing the Spanish European Union Presidency) and Margot Wallström, Member of the European Commission. (80KB PDF file)
 
Second Meeting of the U.S.-Japan High-Level Consultations on Climate Change
In a joint press statement on April 5, the United States and Japan agreed to promote cooperation on reduction of greenhouse gases that cause global warming through investigation of market incentives, as well identification of promising avenues for research. (25KB PDF file)
 
United States Announces Dr. Susan Solomon (NOAA) as Co-Chair of IPCC Working Group I
The United States announces its nomination of Dr. Susan Solomon of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration as Co-Chair of the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Working Group I, and its support of Dr. Rajendra K. Pachauri, the candidate proposed by the government of India, as Panel Chairman. (23KB PDF file)
 
James Mahoney Sworn in as Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere
At a Commerce Department ceremony in Washington, D.C., on April 2nd, James R. Mahoney, was sworn in as the assistant secretary of commerce for oceans and atmosphere. In this capacity, he is a chief manager of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the nation's top science agency for oceans and the atmosphere under its current administrator Vice Admiral Conrad C. Lautenbacher, USN (ret.). Commerce Secretary Don Evans administered the oath of office. (58.3KB PDF file)
 
U.S. Is Committed to Combating Global Climate Change
U.S. Ambassador Minikes' statement to the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) Permanent Council in Vienna March 7, "U.S. efforts compare very favorably to those of the EU, Japan and Canada. Reducing greenhouse gas intensity by 18 percent over the next ten years is comparable to the average progress that nations participating in the Kyoto protocol are projected to achieve…the United States is in the front ranks of nations committed to combating global climate change." (16KB PDF file)
 
Climate Coordination Announced Between the United States and Canada
The governments of the United States and Canada announced an agreement to expand and intensify their existing bilateral efforts to address global climate change. This initiative involves many U.S. agencies and Canadian departments and agencies which are already actively engaged in this issue. (25KB PDF file)
 
Dr. Harlan L. Watson, Senior Climate Negotiator and Special Representative Remarks to Japanese Journalists at the U. S. Embassy in Japan
Dr. Watson's statement following the second meetings of the U.S.-Japan High-Level Consultations Working Groups on Climate Change Science and Technology and on Developing Countries, February 25-26, 2002. These meetings were conducted under the June 30, 2001 agreement of President George W. Bush and Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi to undertake "high-level U.S.-Japan government-to-government consultations to explore common ground and areas for common action on climate change." (36KB PDF file)
 
Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases 2000 (February 2002)
Title XVI, Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) directed the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to establish a mechanism for "the voluntary collection and reporting of information on…annual reductions of greenhouse gas emissions and carbon fixation achieved through any measures…" This publication summarizes data reported for 2000, the seventh year of data collection for the Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program. (1.4MB PDF file)
 
Climate Action Partnership Announced Between Australia and the United States
The governments of the United States and Australia announced an agreement to establish a Climate Action Partnership. The agreement was reached following meetings on climate change held in Washington this week between Dr. David Kemp, Australian Minister for the Environment and Heritage, and several senior members of the U.S. Administration. (26KB PDF file)
 
President George W. Bush's "Global Climate Change Policy Book"
A detailed summary of the President's new approach to the challenge of global climate change. This approach is designed to harness the power of markets and technological innovation (156KB PDF file)
 
"Realism in Cutting Emissions" by R. Glenn Hubbard (Op-ed Column from The New York Times 02/15/02)
This column by R. Glenn Hubbard, chairman of the President's Council of Economic Advisers, first appeared in the New York Times February 15 and is in the public domain.(91KB PDF file)
 
Opening Statement of James R. Mahoney Before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, Nominated to be Assistant Secretary of Commerce For Oceans and Atmosphere

 
U.S.-Italy Bilateral "Joint Climate Change Research Meeting"
The United States and Italy convened a bilateral "Joint Climate Change Research Meeting" in Rome on January 22-23, 2002, following upon the July 19, 2001 pledge of President George W. Bush and Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi to undertake joint research on climate change. This pledge recognized the need to draw on sound science and the power of technology to reduce the uncertainty associated with future global climate and environmental change. (62KB PDF file)
 
"Confronting Global Challenges"
Remarks by Paula J. Dobriansky (US Under Secretary of State for Global Affairs) to a National Foreign Policy Conference for Leaders of Nongovernmental Organization, Washington, DC, 26 October 2001 (122KB PDF file)
 
"Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop: Circles of Wisdom"
Final Report of "Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop: Circles of Wisdom" October 28 - November 1, 1998, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the American Indian Chamber of Commerce of New Mexcio, and the City of Albuquerque. (820KB PDF file)
 
Remarks at the Seventh Session of the Conference of Parties (COP-7)
Remarks by Paula J. Dobriansky (US Under Secretary of State for Global Affairs) to the Seventh Session of the Conference of Parties (COP-7) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, Marrakech, Morocco, 7 November 2001 (66KB PDF file)
 
Closing Statement to the Seventh Session of the Conference of Parties (COP-7)
Closing statement by Paula J. Dobriansky (US Under Secretary of State for Global Affairs) to the Seventh Session of the Conference of Parties (COP-7) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, Marrakech, Morocco, 9 November 2001 (72KB PDF file)

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