Level 3 banner
About USIJI
About USIJI
News and Events
USIJI Projects
USIJI Publications
Other Resources
Links
Search
 
What is JI/USIJI?
The concept of "Joint Implementation" (JI) was introduced early in the negotiations leading up to the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, and was formally adopted into the text of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The United States joined more than 150 countries in signing the FCCC, which explicitly provides through Article 4(2)(a) for signatories to meet their obligation to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions "jointly with other Parties." The term "JI" has been used subsequently to describe a wide range of possible arrangements between entities in two or more countries, leading to the implementation of cooperative development projects that seek to reduce, avoid, or sequester GHG emissions. 

In October 1993, the United States launched the U.S. Initiative on Joint Implementation (USIJI) as part of President Clinton’s Climate Change Action Plan. The program was designed to attract private sector resources to encourage the diffusion of innovative technologies to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and promote sustainable development. USIJI is a voluntary pilot program and is the largest and most developed of the several pilot programs of its type operating worldwide to explore the potential of JI. It is administered by an interagency secretariat co-chaired by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, with significant participation from the U.S. Agency for International Development and the U.S. Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Interior, State, and Treasury

USIJI is a flexible nonregulatory program that encourages participants in the United States to engage in GHG-reducing projects overseas. 

] Top | Home [
] About | News | Projects | Publications | Resources| Links | Search
                                                                Copyright © 1999  USIJI
                                                                Most recent revision September 27, 1999